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What We Just Dug Up

10-07-2015

 

 

    FALL 2015 
ROMAN FOOTPRINTS FOUND IN ISRAEL LINKED TO 1ST-CENTURY SOLDIER
Archeologists have discovered perfectly preserved footprints in Israel that reveal the details of a Roman soldier's shoes. The prints were discovered at the Hippos-Sussita archeological site east of the Sea of Galilee. Researchers believe the footprints belonged to a Roman because they lay within the remains of a Roman bastion, a structure protruding from a defensive artillery wall. Find more information here

ARCHEOLOGISTS UNEARTH ANCIENT FORTIFICATIONS AT COASTAL SITE IN ISRAEL 

An international team of archeologists has uncovered remains of a massive fortification wall and enclosure dating back to the Iron Age 
at the coastal archeological site known as Ashdod-Yam, 25 miles south of Tel Aviv. The site contains the remains of a fortified settlement, which likely bordered an important port facility during the era of Assyrian control in the 8th and 7th centuries BCE. The team is continuing excavations, focusing on the inside of the enclosure, where they may have found the remains of the 'citadel' of Ashdod-Yam. 
UNEXPECTED MOSAICS REVEALED IN ANCIENT SYNAGOGUE
Excavations in the ancient Jewish village of Huqoq have revealed incredible floor mosaics in the buried ruins of a synagogue. Based on artifacts such as potsherds and coins from the synagogue's foundations, they believe the building dates back to the fifth century. One mosaic depicts elephants outfitted for war, which represents the first time a non-biblical story has been illustrated in an ancient synagogue. Other images found include theater masks, cupids, colorful birds, floral garlands and dancing male figures likely associated with Dionysus, the Greco-Roman god of wine, revelry and the theater. Excavations are still ongoing to determine the reasons for these symbols. 
Photo by Mark Thiessen, National Geographic
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